Michael J. Farris


Is an architecture student at The Rhode Island School of Design, RISD, and recently studied abroad at the ETH Zurich. Michael is receving a  minor in the Theory History of Art & Design.



As a future entrepreneur, Michael is fascinated by thresholds, third spaces, contested lands, and everything that lies in the "in-between". Living within these intersections allows him to increase the surface area of serendipity.


CV

Email
Instagram
Twitter
LinkedIn

Michael J. Farris


Is an architecture student
at The Rhode Island School of Design, and recently studied abroad at the ETH Zurich.  

As a future entrepreneur, Michael is fascinated by thresholds, third spaces, contested lands, and everything that lies in the "in-between". Living within these intersections allows him to increase the surface area of serendipity- a tool that is all too often forgotten.

He is currently looking for a full-time paid internship from May 2022-August 2022. 

CV 

Email
Instagram
Twitter
LinkedIn
A Collection of  Columns

During Emperor Hadrian's reign in Rome, he ordered Apollodorus of Damascus to rebuild the Pantheon. Upon arrival at the Pantheon, you are greeted by a typical Etruscan style Temple, large overhanging eaves, widely spaced columns and a deep front porch. It is not until you venture inside the structure that you witness the magic that the pantheon reveals.

Similarly, the four columns in my pier along the entry port of Miami, act as an element of deception. They individually highlight a given element: water, wind, rain, and atmosphere. In order to partake in the magic, you must venture beneath the pier into each individual column.




Quick Thoughts on Space 

Here is a dumping ground of test model Iterations. They are meant to satisfy my spatial urges and are not tied to any specific project. These images exist in my personal archive meant for me to revive at no particular point in time. 

They are usually dirty, covered in masking tape and have visual residue of thinking while making. 




Liminal or Limitless? 

Utalizing cloud point modeling with laser scanning technology we scanned the service tunnel underneath the ETH Zurich main building. A point cloud model consists of huge amounts of data points in three dimensions (with X, Y and Z coordinates).

We were fascianted by tight thresholds of passageways under the buidling especially as it realtes to sound. 

Collaborator: Joseph Inglima

Critic: Christopher Griot


La Linea Para Todos: System Changer or System Stabilizer?

Our studio was based in the province of Andalucia, which is located along the southern coast of Spain and has the largest concentration of greenhouses in the world. The town has a significant water problem and is currently on track to run out of potable water in the next 15 years.

Through a PPP or public-private partnership, we devised a 35-kilometer desalinization pipe that uses the hot Spanish sun to evaporate saltwater. The pipe runs through the streets of Almeria while also providing numerous opertunities for personal entrepreneurship underneath by local farmers and business owners.

Collaborator: Leon Kallert  

Critic: Arno Brandlhuber 



Drowning Debris

Utalizing virtual reality program, Gravity Sketch, it gave us the opportunity to mold and virtually create objects with our hands that we have seen in varies churches across Europe. We questioned the notion of gravity early in the process. While designing our first columns, organizing them from ground to sky felt absurd in the absence of both.  

We spotlighted three elements: the column, the chain, and the debris. As one progresses through the assortment of elements, the columns begin to scatter and dissolve. The chain thus links these elements, acting as an opposing force to the thick columns. Under tension, they keep  them in a coherent whole, resisting the entropy of a world under expansion.

Critic: Karin Sander