Michael J. Farris


Is a senior architecture student at The Rhode Island School of Design, RISD, and recently studied abroad at the ETH Zurich,  during the Fall 2021 semester. Addionally, he is concenrtating in The Theory Hisoty of Art & Design.



As a future entrepreneur, Michael is fascinated by thresholds, third spaces, contested lands, and everything that lies in the "in-between". Living within these intersections allows him to increase the surface area of serendipity.


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Michael J. Farris


Is a senior architecture student
at The Rhode Island School of Design, currently studying abroad at the ETH Zurich, department of architecture for the Fall 2021 semester.

As a future entrepreneur, Michael is fascinated by thresholds, third spaces, contested lands, and everything that lies in the "in-between". Living within these intersections allows him to increase the surface area of serendipity- a tool that is all too often forgotten.

He is currently looking for a full-time paid internship from May 2022-August 2022. 

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Occupying the Third Space 

What would happen if one designed for the unexpected? An unpleasant state which usually operates in the unknown. We are not familiar with it because we crave comfort and rational surroundings. In an attempt to design a physical representation of this irrational space, we envisioned a wall

A wall creates comfortable surroundings. But can a wall itself be considered comfortable? By entering a space that is not designed for human interaction nor the comfort of maintaining prolonged conversation, we begin to uncover a third space. The interior of a wall is a space only thought of in terms of enhancing our pleasure on the exterior. As we enter this undesigned compartment, we blur and dissociate the boundary in which the function of a wall is programmed to do. 

Jesse Calderon

Critic: Lu Heintz 
12/15/2019