Michael J. Farris


Is an architecture student at The Rhode Island School of Design, RISD, and recently studied abroad at the ETH Zurich,  during the Fall 2021 semester. Additionally, he is minoring in The Theory History of Art & Design.



As a future entrepreneur, Michael is fascinated by thresholds, third spaces, contested lands, and everything that lies in the "in-between". Living within these intersections allows him to increase the surface area of serendipity.


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Michael J. Farris


Is a senior architecture student
at The Rhode Island School of Design, currently studying abroad at the ETH Zurich, department of architecture for the Fall 2021 semester.

As a future entrepreneur, Michael is fascinated by thresholds, third spaces, contested lands, and everything that lies in the "in-between". Living within these intersections allows him to increase the surface area of serendipity- a tool that is all too often forgotten.

He is currently looking for a full-time paid internship from May 2022-August 2022. 

CV 

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Twitter
LinkedIn
A Collection of  Columns

During Emperor Hadrian's reign in Rome, he ordered Apollodorus of Damascus to rebuild the Pantheon. Upon arrival at the Pantheon, you are greeted by a typical Etruscan style Temple, large overhanging eaves, widely spaced columns and a deep front porch. It is not until you venture inside the structure that you witness the magic that the pantheon reveals.

Similarly, the four columns in my pier along the entry port of Miami, act as an element of deception. They individually highlight a given element: water, wind, rain, and atmosphere. In order to partake in the magic, you must venture beneath the pier into each individual column.